The Next Google, eBay and PayPal All Rolled Into One – DXinOne

By , December 7, 2018 10:08 pm

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Ever wonder who the next Google, eBay or PayPal is going to be? Want to “get in on the ground floor” like the early employees of these companies who got cheap stock options and were able to cash them in later for big payoffs? This article will guide you toward just such an opportunity — one that anyone can take advantage of with a modest investment of time and money.

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Ever wonder who the next Google, eBay or PayPal is going to be? Want to “get in on the ground floor” like the early employees of these companies who got cheap stock options and were able to cash them in later for big payoffs? This article will guide you toward just such an opportunity — one that anyone can take advantage of with a modest investment of time and money.

Google. eBay. PayPal. These are currently the biggest names on the Internet (not counting MicroSoft). But rewind just 7-10 years back to the late 1990’s. Who were the biggest names on the Internet then? Yahoo. AltaVista. Netscape. And America Online (AOL).

Do you see where I’m going with this? Things change. Markets change. Original ideas rise to the fore, and better mousetraps do get invented every once in awhile. From time to time, an original idea will succeed in its original form until someone buys it up and runs it into the ground. Or, perhaps, a competitor copycats the idea and doesn’t necessarily build it better, but rather has a better marketing department and/or more money behind them (Microsoft vs. Apple).

Sometimes, a startup (PayPal) will be wildly successful and then be bought out and be even more successful with the backing of the new buyer (eBay). And sometimes, competition ends up being healthy, with multiple vendors offering similar products and services. The main point is this: competitive forces are constantly driving and changing the marketplace.

One thing that Google, eBay and PayPal have all proven in recent years is that “better mousetraps” can benefit from meteoric rises to the top of the charts/markets/collective-consciousness. If you think about it, it really was not all that long ago that none of these companies even existed. But yet today, nearly every Internet user on this planet knows who these 3 companies are AND HOW TO GET TO THEIR WEBSITES – and that literally means BILLIONS of people.

So what does this have to do with DXinOne? Here’s what I know: DXinOne has been working for more than 5 years to create similar services to each of these three giants. I could also throw in names such as Travelocity, TimeShares.com, and CraigsList as “names” that correlate to service-lines that DXinOne is working on and/or already has in place.

adsXposed is a lot like Google’s AdSense and AdWords programs. With Google, publishers use AdSense to add advertising streams to their websites, while advertisers use AdWords to place the ads that run on that network and on Google’s search network. In DXinOne, there is also an added wrinkle which I will cover separately in it’s own article — an affiliate program that enables you to earn commissions on advertising purchases.

DXinOne is currently working on releasing DXFinder, DXClassifieds, DXConcierge, DXTraveller and DXTravelAgent, just to name a few of their upcoming service lines.

DXFinder is a full-fledged search engine. Google rapidly rose to dominance by simply inventing a better search engine than anyone else had or has been able to come up with since. Will DXFinder be a superior search engine to Google? Only time will tell, but they are serious about entering the market and it certainly should help amplify the inherent value and market- acceptance of adsXposed as well as all of the other DXServices.

DXAuctions is also forthcoming. This will compete directly with eBay. This would seem to be an even more daunting task than competing with Google, but wait: eBay has owned PayPal for several years now, and they have still yet to “get on the ball” and implement something that DXAuctions will have in place from Day One – actually it’s already “in place” within the DXSystem and has been for several years — built-in escrow payment capabilities. DXDirects will help eliminate a lot of the fraud that pervades so many innocent people’s eBay shopping experiences.

And as a “payment processor”, DXinOne is going to be playing in a league in which it has no peers. DXAccounts are so much more secure than PayPal accounts. PayPal transactions are subject to charge-backs and highly susceptible to fraud. DXinOne requires users to provide extensive identification and place of residence/business documentation in order to earn a high rating and have access to all the features of the DXSystem. At PayPal, a fraudster can sign up for an account and within 5 minutes be using a stolen credit card to commit fraudulent transactions. That just does not and will not happen with DXinOne because they have specifically taken the time to “get it right”. They’ve been in development for 5+ years. These are not just some ideas that have been thrown against the wall to see what sticks. They have studied the competition and evolved their offerings into “better mousetraps”.

If you’d like to read more about the e-currency exchange opportunities available through DXinOne, please visit our website where we’ve published some articles in the past several months that will give you some more background information on this “big picture” concept: we are in the right place at the right time. With DXinOne, we are “early birds”, much like the early employees of Google with their stock options – it’s structured quite a bit differently, quite a bit better actually – but the basic principle is the same.

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Web Site Analysis 101

By , December 3, 2018 8:29 pm

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Eliminate guesswork and measure success ?that is what analysing your website visitors’ behaviour [or web analytics] is all about. Understanding where they came from, where they land and what people are doing on your site.

Virtually all web-hosting services provide rudimentary analytics that can help you begin to understand what users are doing on your site. But most hosting services just don’t provide more sophisticated tools. Tools such as funnel reports, which show how …

web analytics, mis, analysis, reporting, statistics

Eliminate guesswork and measure success ?that is what analysing your website visitors’ behaviour [or web analytics] is all about. Understanding where they came from, where they land and what people are doing on your site.

Virtually all web-hosting services provide rudimentary analytics that can help you begin to understand what users are doing on your site. But most hosting services just don’t provide more sophisticated tools. Tools such as funnel reports, which show how visitors are progressing through the various stages or levels of your site ?hopefully to become a lead / conversion / sale or navigation reports which give you visitor activity such as entry points; where they clicked; where they came from; where they went; how much time they spent on a page and their exit points. Then there are tools such as segmentation reports which track the behaviour of specific groups of visitors such as purchasers, those who came from Google etc. and robot reports which monitor when search engine spiders index your site

There are free packages you can use from ClickTracks or Google but you must apply to Google and it can take weeks for them to set you up whereas ClickTracks Appetizer is free, immediate and includes several of ClickTracks’ most popular features like overlay view, path view, page analysis and basic visitor labeling.

But once you have a web analytics tool what do you do with it? To many people statistics can be daunting and interpreting what they mean can be painful; but hey, no pain, no gain.

The first thing you need to understand is some basic terms:

Hit: a request for a file from your web server noted in the log.

Page view: a request for a file whose type is defined as a page in log analysis or an occurrence of the page tagging script being run in page tagging. In log analysis, a single page view may generate multiple hits as all the resources required to view the page (images, .js and .css files) are also requested from your web server.

Visitor session: a series of requests from the same unique visitor with in a single visit. A visit is expected to contain multiple hits (in log analysis) and page views.

Unique visitor: the uniquely identified client generating requests on your web server (log analysis) or viewing pages (page tagging). A unique visitor can, of course, make many visits.

Repeat visitor: a visitor that has made at least one previous visit.

New visitor: a visitor that has not made any previous visits.

Referring search terms: the search phrases people are using to find your site.

Referring URLs: tell you which web sites are sending you traffic.

Content popularity: the list of most popular pages on your site.

Site overlay: displays your actual pages with a click level indicator next to each link showing the number of people who click on each link.

Bounce rate: reveals the number of visitors who left the site from a particular page.

OK most of those are obvious but they are still worth laying out. In future articles I’ll expand on some of these terms and on the whole subject.

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